Tag Archives: nurse

Reunited and it feels so good.

Finally, after 30 months, three states, nearly 50 labors (attended, not personally experienced) I have graduated from Vanderbilt and moved to Seattle to be reunited with Sugar.

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I am also glad to be back together with Jared, who has been extremely supportive of me in a way that makes me smile from the inside-out. I can’t express the overwhelming sense of accomplishment and relief that comes from having successfully completed this stretch of long-distance relationship-ing. I am hopeful we won’t have to do this again, but I know better than to make declarative statements on that front. I also have some exciting news that has to do with pregnancy — those belonging to my future clients at my new job (see what I did there).

I have accepted a position as a certified nurse midwife with Empowered Pregnancy, a new birth center opening this summer in Kirkland, WA. We will be offering full scope midwifery and women’s health services to those living in the greater Seattle area. I will now wait while you take a moment to like our Facebook page. If you chose to ignore my instructions, I am a little salty with you, but will support your choices. Speaking of supporting choices, I am also working as a clinician with Planned Parenthood which, combined with opening a new birth center, is pretty much my dream scenario.

I’ve spent the last six weeks sitting around, reading, wandering and re-watching The West Wing, which may sound like a queen’s existence, but I’m ready to get back into the world of three dimensions and put this pricey education to work. Hopefully I will be able to use my new-found lack of time to be a more active blogger, which would bring me great joy. Or maybe this is just an Monday morning energy boost, who can tell?

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Midwifery FAQ

1. What the hell does 6cm look like?

Sure, I could pull out a tape measure and treat you like an adult, but instead please direct your attention to this gross chart so I can fulfill a childhood dream of mine by comparing your cervix to a bagel (which, by the way, vary in size greatly).

Source: Sweet Leigh Mama

2. Why is the midwife always squeezing my tummy? And who is this Leopold?

Christian Gerhard Leopold (24 February 1846 – 12 September 1911) was a German gynecologist who developed these four maneuvers for determining the position of the fetus in the uterus. They are used by midwives to assess for a breech presentation (feet or butt first) and to estimate the size of the growing fetus.

Source: Wikipedia

3. Oh, you’re going to be a midwife? Is that better than a doula?

Well, that’s like asking if a pilot is better than a flight attendant. It’s not wrong, it just means our profession needs a better PR department.

But yes, I’m also a doula — many of us are.

Source: Ancestral Wellness Temple

4. Why is my baby covered in cheese? No, I don’t want to touch it. You touch it!

Vernix is an expected finding on a newborn and its benefits (along with thermoregulation) are part of the reason the WHO recommends that baby’s first bath be delayed at least 6 hours (and ideally 24h).

Sidebar: Has anyone checked out The Alternative Mom, from whom I stole this photo via the Pinterest? She sounds feisty.

Source: The Alternative Mom

5. What exactly is the difference between a vagina, a cervix and a uterus?

More than you’d think! If a female person is standing up, the vagina is closest to the ground and is accessible through the middle of the three openings that persons with two X chromosomes typically have.

The cervix is the (normally closed) canal that leads to the uterus and becomes thinner and more open during labor. Ask to take a look the next time you have a pelvic exam or check back here soon for a series I’m working on called Guess Whose Cervix?*

For more info on the cervix, check out this great post on Across The Speculum.

The uterus is the uppermost cavity where tissue builds up every month to either support a fertilized egg, be shed during a woman’s period or be safely reabsorbed if she is on progesterone-only contraception (more on that later).

For now, this:

Source (and on sale now): Blue Barn House Store

*currently accepting photos for this series at leacraftspencer@gmail.com

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Certified Nurse Midwife: Huh?

I wait tables in Nashville from time to time and am often caught explaining to people what I really do. Servers love this question because it manages to be invasive and critical at the same time. On one such occasion I was explaining to the stranger who had inquired that, in addition to supporting myself by waiting on people like her, I was a nurse and studying to be a midwife. She became very excited and said, “Oh, wow! My niece is doing the same thing. Oh, no… wait.. No, I’m sorry, my niece is going to be a nanny.” Now, I’ve answered an impressive range of questions about what a midwife is, how it is similar to a doctor and how it differs from a witch. But this genuine mistaking of a midwife for a nanny has been by far the most amusing.

Nursing school is a bubble land and it can be very difficult to remember how little the public really knows about advanced practice nursing. This is partly because the profession is evolving and has been for the past several decades, but it’s also because the general public doesn’t really care where their healthcare comes from — which is fine. It’s my job to know how to be a midwife, but it’s also important to offer digest-able knowledge to people when they want it (if only for the survival of our trade). To that end, I went digging for some straightforward definitions of what a midwife is and came across this infographic from 2010.* Some of the information might be a little dated, but I think it breaks it down pretty well. What do you think?

 

Infographics: making complicated concepts simple enough for you, me and everyone we know.

(Source: Scrubs Magazine)

*That’s a lie — I was looking for giggle-worthy memes and found this by accident. Whew, felt good to get that off my chest.

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Peer Pressure, I’m very sensitive.

It has been a minute since I’ve used this space but two of my best friends have recently taken to the social media and now I’m gonna, too! Their excellent writing has impressed in me the importance of using the online to spread information about women’s health. Please check out this great blog: https://acrossthespeculum.tumblr.com/ and follow this twitter feed: @southern_stdtNM. These are two brilliant women who inspire me to be more but make me feel like I’m enough. It’s possible that I will write some about women’s health, but no promises.

A lot has happened since I’ve been away. We lived in Carolina while Jared did the MBA thing and then we backpacked around South America for a few months (cause when else are we going to have the time?) and now I live in Nashville where I’m studying to be a midwife (what?) and Jared lived in Seattle, where he works for Amazon. We also exchanged sarcastic nuptials in a bar last March. Mazel to us.

But back to being a student midwife and all the amazing women I get to grow into this role with. After spending a year becoming an RN, which included spending time with a lot of 22-year-old blonde women, I am proud to call one or two of them my friends. My other comrades in this program are older, wiser and more brunette (although the true geniuses among us remain defiantly blonde). We are a motley crew of individuals from all over the country with different goals and opinions about women’s health. How great is that?

Our group runs the gamut. We have die-hard liberals eager to take issue with the status quo as well as southern conservatives whose norms are being challenged. I believe the breadth of experiences each of us bring makes all of us better. Our differences are representative of the wide range of women we will be serving, all of whom deserve health care providers who will advocate for their wants and needs.

A brilliant friend once said, “If I’m ignorant about something don’t belittle me, educate me.” This knife cuts both ways because I know firsthand that liberal New Yorkers are just as capable of being closed-minded as conservative Texans. Being truly able to embrace newness without judgment is a skill I have yet to master, but it’s one I aspire to. We have only to gain from being open to learning from people who are different from us. It’s when we think we’ve figured it all out that we’re really missing opportunities to grow.

This program has shown me both that I know nothing, Jon Snow, and that I’m capable of literally anything. We all are. In 18 months Vanderbilt has turned 140 students, some fresh of out undergrad, into nurses on their way to becoming NPs. What’s an NP do again? They help the doctor, right? And midwives – are they really still a thing?

In a nutshell, a nurse-midwife is an advanced practice nurse just like a nurse practitioner. A nurse practitioner is an independent health care provider who can work with or without doctors in a variety of settings. Other types of nurse practitioners include those who work in primary care, those who work in acute care (the hospital), those who just see kids, those who just see older folks and those who specialize in mental health. 95% of CNMs (certified nurse midwives) work in hospitals attending vaginal births and our scope of practice includes primary care for women from puberty through menopause.

Pelvic exams, STI testing, contraception prescribing, IUD insertions, prenatal care, labor and birth support, sexual health needs, menopause symptom management — midwives do it all.

The more you know.

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